An Interview With S.D. McPhail – Part 3

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Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Last October, by a stroke of good fortune and timing, I was offered a chance to review one of the most unique novels I’ve encountered in a long time. After a few months of discussions, my friend S.D. McPhail agreed to allow me to publish it. Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is, without a doubt, one of a kind. I’m also pleased to say that it’s not just unique – it’s also actually good. The book is available for pre-order now, and will be available for purchase this Saturday. I highly recommend buying a copy and reading it. But if you can’t wait until Friday (and let’s face it, you really are that excited about this book!) I’ve got a three part interview with Ms. McPhail.

As with my typical interviews, one part will post each day through the end of the week. Wednesday’s Part 1 focused on the book itself. Yesterday’s Part 2 focused on Ms. McPhail’s experiences with writing and publishing. Finally, Today’s Part 3 focuses on Ms. McPhail herself. As always, these interviews are presented unedited.

 


 

Aside from authors and works previously listed as inspiration, can you tell us what your own favorite sff authors and works are?

One of my all-time favorite books is Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land. I adore Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern series. I’ve been a fan of Stephen King since Carrie, although I had to take a break from him for a long time after Cujo. I’m still catching up on some of his books I haven’t read yet. J.K. Rowling is my idol. If only I could be as imaginative as she!

 

Favorite current sff show and/or movie?

Just saw Star Trek Beyond and it currently tops my favorite recent movie list. But that list is subject to frequent change and if next year’s Kong: Skull Island is as good as the trailer, it will have a turn at the top of the list. There are likely to be several at the number one spot in the interim between those two.
The other day I finished binge-watching the Netflix series Stranger Things. Loved it! Comparisons from fans ranged from The Goonies to E.T. to Stand by Me, but I found it strongly reminiscent of Super-8, another on my all-time favorites list. Just read that it’s confirmed for a second season, so go watch all eight episodes of the first season now so you’ll be conversant when everyone else finds out about this little gem.

I am also waiting, rather impatiently, for the return of Game of Thrones.

 

Favorite current non-sff show and/or movie?

Favorite TV show is Big Bang Theory. Love me some loveable nerds. As a history nerd, not to mention a fan of Matthew McConaughey, I loved Free State of Jones. Now I want to read the book it was based on.

 

Favorite current sff books?

I’ve been on a YA binge lately with books. Finished the phenomenal Ashes trilogy by Ilsa J. Bick not long ago. Just started reading White Space, a more recent book by Ilsa, and it’s equally amazing.

 

Favorite current non-sff books?

The Devil in the White City: Murder, Magic, and Madness at the Fair That Changed America was fascinating. True history again, about Dr. H. H. Holmes, the serial killer whose “Murder Castle” must have been the inspiration for American Horror Story: Hotel.

 

What did you do before you became a writer?

I was a marketing communications specialist who wrote a lot of copy and created marketing materials, brochures, proposals, technical documents, illustrations, presentations, and website content for all kinds of clients.

 

Do you still have a “real” job? If so, what do you do?

Yes, I have a real job. I am a writer.

 

Do you have a college degree? If so, what in?

Yes, my degree is a Bachelor of Business Administration. Maybe if I had majored in English, it wouldn’t have taken me so long to discover the joys of writing fiction.

[Editor’s note: from what I can tell, majoring in English seems to have the opposite effect.]

 


 

And that’s it for this interview – but you really should take the time to check out her book!


An Interview With S.D. McPhail – Part 2

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Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Last October, by a stroke of good fortune and timing, I was offered a chance to review one of the most unique novels I’ve encountered in a long time. After a few months of discussions, my friend S.D. McPhail agreed to allow me to publish it. Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is, without a doubt, one of a kind. I’m also pleased to say that it’s not just unique – it’s also actually good. The book is available for pre-order now, and will be available for purchase this Saturday. I highly recommend buying a copy and reading it. But if you can’t wait until Friday (and let’s face it, you really are that excited about this book!) I’ve got a three part interview with Ms. McPhail.

As with my typical interviews, one part will post each day through the end of the week. Yesterday’s Part 1 focused on the book itself. Today’s Part 2 focuses on Ms. McPhail’s experiences with writing and publishing. Finally, Tomorrow’s Part 3 will focus on Ms. McPhail herself. As always, these interviews are presented unedited.

 


 

What made you decide to get serious about writing?

For many years I worked in a corporate environment at various companies, sometimes in positions that were interesting and challenging, other times not so much. When the work got really boring, I started a blog where I wrote movie reviews. I discovered that I enjoyed analyzing what made me like or dislike a film. Most often it came down to how original or well-executed the story was, not the actors or the special effects. Critiquing other stories got me thinking about the kind of story I would like to write. When the contract on my day job ended, that left me with lots of time to do more than just think about it.

 

How long did it take you to write your first novel?

A ridiculously long time because I was learning how to write fiction while I was trying to write a novel.

 

How much time do you spend writing every day?

Not enough and not as much as I would like. I try to put in at least four hours a day. Some days I do well, occasionally I am elated to have spent a good six or eight hours at the keyboard. Then there are the days that life interferes, and I feel guilty about neglecting my characters.

 

Is the second one going any faster?

See the last question. The next one should go must faster because I learned so many valuable lessons while writing The Origin Key.

 

Do you enjoy the writing process or is it a slog?

There are days when it is definitely a slog. On those days, nothing seems to flow easily, the characters refuse to cooperate, and every idea feels trite or stale or obvious or boring. But when it starts to flow well and I can get into the zone, there is no better feeling. That’s when writing is most enjoyable and makes the slog to get there worthwhile.

 

Did you try submitting your works to any traditional or other indie publishers before you settled on Silver Empire? If so, what was the response like?

I sure did. And I made the egregious newbie mistake of querying agents before my novel had been edited and polished enough. I got back polite, standard rejections that showed not the least bit of interest. So I kept rewriting, found an amazing story editor, and continued to query as I made my novel even better. I still got rejections, but usually more personalized with encouraging comments such as “Even though we are not interested in this one, please feel free to query us in future with other novels.” After many, many rejections, it became clear that my story didn’t fit neatly into a single publishing pigeonhole. It blurs lines between genres and isn’t quite like anything else on the sci-fi/fantasy shelves. I believe a lot of the rejection wasn’t due to a poorly written story, but rather an unwillingness to embrace something refreshingly different or a perceived difficulty in marketing a genre-bender.

 

You’re with a pretty small and new publisher. What made you decide to go with us instead of just self-publishing it?

Even though I had heard of a few amazing success stories for self-published authors, I realized those were the exception and not the typical experience for new writers. I could have self-published, but knowing how much work an author has to put into marketing their books these days—whether traditionally or self-published—I wanted help from someone who already knew the ins and outs. I wanted a partner with publishing experience so I could concentrate on writing the next stories in the series while we developed a marketing strategy to sell books. After researching you and Silver Empire, I felt like we would work very well together.

 

How has your publishing experience been so far?

It’s been fantastic! Being able to meet with my publisher and talk in person is an enormous confidence-booster. You’ve been extremely responsive and offered some great ideas. I can’t thank you enough for being willing to listen to me and explaining the business side of things when I have questions. With a small publisher, there’s a lot more personal attention that I’m not sure I would ever get with a busy, overworked agent or a big publishing house.

 


 

That’s it for part 2. Tune in tomorrow for a bit more about Ms. McPhail herself!


An Interview With S.D. McPhail – Part 1

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Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Last October, by a stroke of good fortune and timing, I was offered a chance to review one of the most unique novels I’ve encountered in a long time. After a few months of discussions, my friend S.D. McPhail agreed to allow me to publish it. Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is, without a doubt, one of a kind. I’m also pleased to say that it’s not just unique – it’s also actually good. The book is available for pre-order now, and will be available for purchase this Saturday. I highly recommend buying a copy and reading it. But if you can’t wait until Friday (and let’s face it, you really are that excited about this book!) I’ve got a three part interview with Ms. McPhail.

As with my typical interviews, one part will post each day through the end of the week. Today’s Part 1 focuses on the book itself. Tomorrow’s Part 2 focuses on Ms. McPhail’s experiences with writing and publishing. Finally, Friday’s Part 3 will focus on Ms. McPhail herself. As always, these interviews are presented unedited.

 


 

Congratulations on the pending release of your first novel!

Thank you so much! It’s quite a surreal feeling.

 

Where did the inspiration for Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key come from?

It’s probably the culmination of a lifetime of reading science fiction and fantasy. I tend to prefer adventure stories with a hero who keeps getting back up after being knocked down and who, perhaps reluctantly at first, has the guts to do the right thing even when it’s much easier to simply walk away.

But I’m guessing you’re looking for a more specific answer than that, so here goes. I’ve always loved studying ancient cultures. In fact, my first year as an undergrad was spent majoring in archaeology/anthropology. I am fascinated by how television’s Ancient Aliens can take the most ridiculous theory and make a case for how extraterrestrials were involved in human history, with no way to prove it. I’m also a fan of classic movies, including silent features from Hollywood’s earliest golden era such as 1924’s The Thief of Bagdad starring Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. Combine all of that and add in the premise of another classic movie, 1937’s Lost Horizon about an ancient peaceful society hidden somewhere in the Himalaya Mountains, and call me inspired.

 

Which works and authors would you say influenced the book?

That’s hard to narrow down. I’m a big fan of both Star Trek and Star Wars, not to mention movies like Indiana Jones, Independence Day, Galaxy Quest, Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time, and Guardians of the Galaxy. Dan Brown’s books featuring the intellectual hero Robert Langdon are definitely in the mix. Someone told me The Origin Key could be described as “Aladdin meets Mission Impossible.” I can’t really argue with that.

 

What was your favorite moment of the book to write?

I had it on good authority that you know you are truly a writer when your fictional characters talk to you during the writing process, and perhaps even at random moments throughout the day when you aren’t writing. I experienced an argument with one of my main characters who refused to say the bit of dialog I was typing for him. I tried to convince him that he needed to say it exactly as I had written it, but he was adamant. He won the argument and I changed the dialog. When I realized what had happened, I was elated because I finally felt I was a real writer!

 

What was the hardest part of the book for you to write?

I could answer with “the middle” since it was a bit of a challenge to weave together a lot mystery and intrigue to keep the reader guessing about the final outcome. But what may have been more difficult was writing the fight scenes. Everything that was perfectly choreographed in my mind was not so easy to describe clearly and succinctly.

 

How many more books do you plan for the series?

Right now, I plan to keep writing about Dodrazeb and Rasteem as long as I can invent new adventures for him. I also want to feature some of the other characters, such as Laneffri or Kamran or even Vestanji as the main character in their own novel-length story. So the answer is “a bunch.”

 

Can you give us a hint of what we should expect in the next book(s)?

There will be more revelations about the complex history of Dodrazeb and perhaps what exactly it is the scholars continue to search for. My short story A Ruby for Dyree is sort of a Dodrazebbian fairy tale that Rasteem discovers may contain more fact than legend. It features a ruby that isn’t simply a ruby. Oh, and more than one white tiger.

 

Do you have plans for any more novels outside of Treasures of Dodrazeb?

As a matter of fact, I do. An idea for a cozy mystery series set in a small town in Mississippi populated by eccentric characters with crazy secrets is on my radar.

 

Can you tell us when we should expect your next novel?

I wish I could say very soon, but it might be next year. I’m working hard at writing the next Dodrazeb adventure as fast as I can, but I don’t want to sacrifice quality for speed. I want it to be as entertaining as possible, and that takes time.

 


 

That’s it for part 1. Tune in tomorrow for a bit more about how Ms. McPhail approaches the writing and publishing process!

 

  • An Interview with S.D. McPhail – Part 1
  • An Interview with S.D. McPhail – Part 2
  • An Interview with S.D. McPhail – Part 3

Preorder TREASURES OF DODRAZEB: THE ORIGIN KEY On Amazon

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Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key

I’m excited to announce today that Silver Empire’s first novel, Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key by my friend S.D. McPhail is now available for pre-order on Amazon. This is hands down the best third century Persian historical sci-fi sword-and-science book that I’ve ever read. But don’t take my word for it.

  • “A Smart, thrilling mix of history and fantasy. S.D. McPhail is definitely an author to watch.”

    Brian Niemeier, Campbell Award-nominated author of Souldancer.

  • “The Treasures of Dodrazeb: The Origin Key is a stunning debut novel from an author to watch. McPhail’s creation is packed with tension and excitement, from the political machinations of the empire to the almost Atlantean history of Dodrazeb and mythical Anutupi. The imagery is enchanting, but the adventure is mesmerizing.”

    Ashley Chappell, author of the Dreams of Chaos series.

In the third century, the Persian Empire was a world power whose influence stretched from China to Europe. The king and his sons maintained peace with a powerful army—until the day a horde of screaming vandals attacked the king.

Pursuing a criminal known as the Viper, Prince Rasteem becomes suspicious when the Persian army easily conquers Dodrazeb. Princess Laneffri is desperate to expel the Persian invaders from her kingdom and she will stop at nothing to protect its secrets—especially the Origin Key. Is Dodrazeb hiding the Viper or something even more dangerous? When Rasteem learns what the Origin Key can do, he must find a way to make the princess an ally to save both their kingdoms from annihilation.

Don’t wait – pre-order your copy today and get the special early price of only $2.99!


Ted Cruz is a Dealbreaker

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sadtedBy choosing not to endorse Donald Trump tonight, Ted Cruz guaranteed that he will never be the GOP presidential nominee.

Everyone in DC hates him. Tonight he showed us why. It’s not because he’s separate from the establishment. He’s not and never was. The tail end of the primary cycle demonstrated this conclusively. The establishment rallied around Cruz as their candidate of last resort. It was eminently predictable – and predicted. We know him as their red headed stepchild. But even red headed stepchildren are still part of the family.

But now we know exactly why he’s the red headed stepchild and not the well loved son. He’s a weasel who can’t keep a deal. How do we know? Simple. Ted Cruz was on stage tonight because he’d agreed to endorse Trump. That’s how these things work. If he hadn’t agreed to do it, they wouldn’t have given him such a prominent speaking slot. So clearly he agreed – and then failed to follow through.

This is going to haunt him for the rest of his political career whether or not Trump wins the White House. Ted Cruz is a deal breaker. Whatever his beliefs or your beliefs or anybody else’s beliefs, Ted Cruz has proven beyond a doubt that he’s a man you simply can’t work with. When he runs next – whether in 2020 or 20204 – he will have no allies of any substance because nobody will trust him. And they shouldn’t. He can’t keep his word.

He’s also doomed with the voters. Half of those who voted for him already held their nose to do it. The 35% who voted for Trump will never vote for Cruz now because he just spat in their faces.

Ted Cruz will never be the GOP presidential nominee. Once again, he’s shot himself in the foot with his own ambition. Then again, maybe it’s just his Asperger’s.


Live Tweeting POST TRAUMATIC STRESS

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Morgon and the kids are heading out of town this weekend o visit family. For the first time in a very long while, I’m going to have a good chunk of time at home on my own. I intend to spend it writing. I’m currently about 62,000 words into my first novel, Post Traumatic Stress. I’m targeting 110k for the first draft, with the intention of trimming it down to about 80-90,000 words for the final draft. The draft as written is currently on track for that.

The novel comes in bursts. I’ve gone long periods without much time to write. On the other hand, I’ve had some very good days. I’ve seen friends online talk about 2,000 words being a good day. That’s not me. When I get in the zone, I get in the zone. My best day so far has been over 4,000 words – and that was a day where I’d already been at work all day. When I get in the zone I can pretty easily turn out 500 to 1,000 words in an hour.

This weekend I’ll have little in the way of distractions. I’ll also, for once, have rather a lot of time. I plan to get myself in the zone and move, and I’m targeting 20,000 words as my goal from Friday morning through Monday evening. I think I can make that happen.

More fun, I plan to “live tweet” as I write. Don’t expect something every five minutes, but expect regular progress updates and maybe the occasional hint of something that’s just made it into the book. You can follow the fun on my Twitter feed. Writing will begin in earnest after I get home from work on Friday evening. This will either go very well or very poorly, but either way it ought to be entertaining.

Post Traumatic Stress

Everybody faces demons in war. After surviving a helicopter crash in Afghanistan, Sergeant Michael Alexander came face to face with actual demons. When the Army sent him home on a medical discharge, the demons followed. Now they’re going after his friends and terrorizing his home town. Now Michael must face up to the past, with the help of his not-quite-father-in-law, a young friend, a hapless and overly bureaucratic secret military group that gets in the way more than it helps, and an ancient order of knights chartered by the Vatican.


Nobody Actually Cares About Plagiarism

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melaniaIn the computer science profession there’s a bit of a truism. For four years your college indoctrinates you never to copy anybody else’s code. Do your own work! Then you hit the real world and the first thing you do is… copy everyone else’s code.

Working code is the gold standard in the software industry. And while there are signatures of code that you can often use to detect the author, the reality is that there are only so many ways to translate the same basic algorithm into working code. The truism above is a bit overblown. But it also recognizes a simple reality in our profession: working code proliferates.

Quite a lot of code is written using example code, a segment of a co-worker’s code, an online tutorial, or some other similar snippet as a working model. When we want to do something in our software, quite often one of the first things we do is seek out some example of actual working code… and then use it as a base. Is that plagiarism? Your college would say yes, and an undergraduate could find himself failing a course (or worse) for such an offense. Out in the real world it’s basically expected. Headaches often ensue if the example code has bugs in it. But often it’s the fastest way to get to something that works.

Don’t get me wrong – out and out plagiarism of source code is a copyright violation. It’s straight up illegal, and very few developers actually do that. What I’m describing is a substantially lesser “sin.”

But is it even a sin?

Consider two scenarios: in scenario (A) I use example code from a hypothetical source to get my own code working. In scenario (B) I fight through the (often poor) documentation to get to working code on my own. Given my coding idiosyncrasies, would anybody be able to tell the difference between code I wrote in scenario (A) and the code I wrote in scenario (B)? Sometimes yes. But far more often the answer is no.

Frankly, most technical fields operate this way. Finding the right answer is what matters, and in many cases there is only one correct answer. Engineering often works this way. Ditto architecture and drafting. If getting the answer right is the primary concern you can basically expect this kind of pattern.

The simple reality is this: outside of a few specialized fields, nobody actually much cares about plagiarism. Authors, musicians, filmmakers, and photographers care, of course. In creative fields, plagiarism is a life and death matter. Journalists care. Academics care. Notice anything that links these fields together? In every case it’s important for the original author to receive credit.

The Melania Trump case is a boring one. Journalists, academics, and creative types care. Evidently they care a lot, if my social media feeds are any indication. Nobody else cares much at all – and frankly, they shouldn’t. Our politicians should be plagiarizing people. I don’t care one bit how original the ideas of any of my elected leaders are. I care that they have good ideas. I want them to plagiarize – for the same reason that I want software engineers to look at working code. I want ideas that work. Original ideas seldom do.

At this point somebody is going to bring up the obligatory example of Joe Biden. Biden, for those not yet up to speed, withdrew from the 1988 presidential campaign over plagiarism. Fair point. Let’s discuss it. I have three responses.

  1. I don’t care. I was ten in 1988, I didn’t follow politics, and I didn’t even know this had happened until twenty years after the fact. It shouldn’t have mattered then, either.
  2. Biden withdrew from the 1988 presidential race in the fall of 1987. The plagiarism scandal played a role, sure. But if he’d truly been well positioned for the run, he could – and should – have survived it.
  3. The world has changed since 1988. Journalists ran the world back then, and journalists didn’t like the plagiarism. They made Biden pay. They’re trying to make Melania pay now. They’re about to find out that journalists don’t run the world anymore.

Does this hurt the Trump campaign? Definitely. But only among those who mostly weren’t voting for him anyway. Nobody else cares.


How Many #NeverTrump Endorse Trump This Week?

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sessions_endorses_trumpOne of my own senators, Senator Jeff Sessions, was one of the earliest Donald Trump supporters behind the scenes. Reports show him being friendly to The Donald as early as last fall, and rumor has it that he wrote the GOP nominee’s official immigration plan. Yet the Alabama Senator didn’t officially endorse Trump until February 28th. Why did he wait so long?

Because February 28th was two days before the Alabama primary. The official endorsement came at what was then Trump’s largest rally to date. That rally also happened to be in Alabama.

In other words, they timed the endorsement for maximum effect. Which begs the question: how many supposed #NeverTrump players have planned to endorse Trump all along? And how many are waiting for maximum effect – most likely at Trump’s own request? My guess is “more than zero.”

Don’t get me wrong. I’m quite certain that many #NeverTrumpers are wholly sincere and that many will never, ever endorse him. I’m equally certain that others are merely playing the game. I wholly expect several prominent Republican Trump bashers to make their official endorsements this week.


Turkey Didn’t Happen in Isolation

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People react near a military vehicle during an attempted coup in Ankara, Turkey, July 16, 2016.     REUTERS/Tumay Berkin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

People react near a military vehicle during an attempted coup in Ankara, Turkey, July 16, 2016. REUTERS/Tumay Berkin TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

Yesterday’s coup attempt in Turkey didn’t happen in isolation. Turkey has been at the nexus of global geopolitics since the Trojan War nearly three thousand years ago. Its neighbors have always interfered. There’s no reason to believe that this time is any different. Indeed, the fact that Germany reportedly denied Erdogan asylum indicates that larger forces were at play. The Merkel regime has never met a refugee it didn’t love – so why deny entry to this one? More to the point, though, why deny asylum to the leader of a nation thatthe EU has courted for more than a decade?

We all know how Russia has meddled in the Ukraine. But many are less familiar with the US and Western European interference that predated that. Games are afoot. And as I have noted previously, World War is a fact on the ground whether we want it or not. Escalation was inevitable. The coup attempt in Turkey clearly shows that the next phase is upon us. As I predicted early this year, events are accelerating. They will continue to accelerate as this spirals out of control.

There are no longer any good options open to world leaders to prevent a full blown World War – not of the variety that I’ve been calling out. I’m talking about the kind that nobody can any longer pretend is not a true World War. The only options remain are the ones that nobody has the stomach for.

The powder keg isn’t waiting for a spark. We’re not waiting for the fuse to burn. The primer charges are already firing. Expect the bigger explosions to come soon.


An Interview With Mike Cernovich – Part 3

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A few weeks ago, as I was finishing up my review of Gorilla Mindset, I reached out to Mike Cernovich for a blog interview. He graciously agreed.

Mr. Cernovich is the author of the aforementioned Gorilla Mindset as well as Danger and Play: Essays on Embracing Masculinity and Juice Power!: How to Juice for Healing, Fat Loss, and Lifelong Health. He’s also the producer of the upcoming documentary Silenced! about the decline of free speech in the modern west. Wednesday’s Part 1 focused on his bestselling book, Gorilla Mindset. Yesterday’s Part 2 focused on writing, publishing, and business. Finally, Today’s Part 3 focuses on Mr. Cernovich himself and his upcoming projects. As always, this interview is presented unedited exactly as he gave it to me.

 


 

Aside from authors and works previously listed as inspiration, can you tell us what your own favorite fiction authors and works are?

 

What non-fiction books have been the most helpful to you in finding your own path?

How to Stop Worrying and Start Living by Dale Carnegie. Nietzsche’s stuff is great as well.

A book about cognitive biases called The Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making also completely changed how I viewed “truth,” along with my own abilities to know the truth.

 

What did you do before you became a writer?

Lawyer.

 

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe you’ve long since left the world of real jobs behind. How long ago did you do that, and how did you know you were ready for it?

I’ve been living 100% off of my books and websites for a couple of years, I think.

 

Do you have a college degree? If so, what in?

Philosophy and Legal Studies major, and and I have a J.D. (law degree) as well.

 

What would you say was the single biggest event in your life that set you onto the path you’re on today?

I was falsely accused of rape.

 

If somebody asked you for just one piece of advice on finding their own successful path, what would you tell them?

There’s no such thing as a “big break.” If you’re waiting for that big break to come, if you expect someone to discover you, you’re dead.

Life is a bunch of “little breaks.” Keep hustling every day for years and years. Then, like me, people will say, “Where did that guy come from? He’s an overnight success!” If only. I’m at best a 20 year overnight success.

 


 

And so ends my interview with Mr. Cernovich. Once more I’d like to thank him for taking the time to answer these questions!